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Neon Signage is Back

Updated: Jul 30, 2022

History of Neon Signage


Neon signs are electric signs that are illuminated by long luminous gas-discharge tubes containing rarefied neon or other gases in the signage industry. They are the most common application for neon lighting, which was first demonstrated in a modern form in December 1910 at the Paris Motor Show by Georges Claude. While neon signs are used worldwide, they were popular in the United States from the 1920s to the 1950s. The installations in Times Square, many of which were designed by Douglas Leigh, were legendary, and by 1940, there were nearly 2,000 small shops producing neon signs. In addition to signage, artists and architects frequently use neon lighting.


The neon sign evolved from the earlier Geissler tube, which is a sealed glass tube filled with a "rarefied" gas (the gas pressure in the tube is well below atmospheric pressure). An electrical glow discharge occurs when a voltage is applied to electrodes inserted through the glass. Geissler tubes were popular in the late 1800s, and the various colors they emitted were characteristics of the gases contained within. Because the pressure of the gas inside typically decreased with use, they were unsuitable for general lighting. The Moore tube, which used nitrogen or carbon dioxide as the luminous gas and a patented mechanism to maintain pressure, was the direct predecessor of neon tube lighting. Moore tubes were widely used in commercial lighting for many years.




Times have changed, nowadays we can produce Neon signs with materials other than glass and the use of gas, mainly Led technology.


Our Neon collection is wide, from high strength and durability methacrylate mounts, stainless steel brackets or under our 3D digital printing technology with 100% recyclable organic material.


If you need to buy neon signs, contact us and we will offer you all our options.






Credits

Vintage Neon Pic rights: https://www.freepik.com/photos/light-sign

Light sign photo created by topntp26 - www.freepik.com


Neon: https://www.freepik.com/photos/neon-bar"

Neon bar photo created by freepik - www.freepik.com



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